The MicroSeismic Study Group

Denver Geophysical Society

Microseismic Study Group

 

“Precise Perforation Shot Timing

for Microseismic Monitoring”

Presented via webinar by

Julian Drew, SigmaCubed

February 21, 2017

TIME:  11:30 am – 12:30 pm Mountain Standard Time

THIS IS A WEBINAR – WE ARE NOT MEETING AT PINNACLE/HALLIBURTON

ATTENDANCE WILL BE LIMITED TO 100 PEOPLE

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1394028292668953090
Webinar ID: 993-065-595

(No invitation is necessary)

The February 21st Microseismic Study Group will be a webinar presented by Julian Drew of SigmaCubed.  The meeting will be at 11:30 a.m. Denver time – the normal time of Microseismic Study Group meetings.  Attendance will be limited to 100 people, in the order of registration.

Abstract:

 

Typical hydraulic fracturing projects involves hundreds of perforation shots. When the completion is also monitored for microseismic these shots are recorded often by more than one downhole array and also potentially a surface array. The only real difference to an active source cross-well or reverse VSP survey is that the shot times in an active source survey are known.

 

Just think, if the perforation shots times were also recorded how much more useful this data can be in anisotropic velocity model calibration.

 

As it turns out it there is a straight forward way to record the shot time, which begs the question why is it not recorded on all microseismic surveys and how can we change this. The main issue tends to be the way in which the services are contracted separately for perforating and microseismic.  We can discuss some of the issues and how we can go about changing this.

 

Author’s biography:

 

Julian Drew has some 15 years’ experience working on technology for microseismic acquisition and processing.  He has just recently joined Sigma Cubed as Microseismic Technical Director, having worked for Schlumberger for more than 20 years in a number of different capacities, including Wireline, Seismic, Engineering and Research.